Gronell Klondike Boots?

And that's what I'm gonna do. Wait, sorry, I got distracted. Everyone talks about boots, so they get their own special forum.
Post Reply
sick.muse
Starting to Post
Posts: 2
Joined: Sat Jan 23, 2010 2:17 pm

Gronell Klondike Boots?

Post by sick.muse » Sun Mar 14, 2010 4:23 pm

Has anyone planted with the Gronell Klondike boots? http://www.mec.ca/Products/product_list ... 8608759073
I tried them on and they fit beautifully, but they are really heavy and I'm kind of turned off by the cost, especially if they'll end up being too heavy & need to buy a new pair of boots part way through...
If anyone has actually planted in these it would be a huge help to hear how it worked out for you.

Any suggestions from Marks Work Wearhouse? My options are rather limited... I need steel toe/shank for contracts in Quesnel area.


Thanks!

Guillermo
Regular Contributor
Posts: 26
Joined: Sun Mar 16, 2008 8:06 am

Re: Gronell Klondike Boots?

Post by Guillermo » Sun Mar 14, 2010 4:47 pm

They are amazing boots. I've never planted with them myself, but know people who have and they are bombproof, you don't need to worry about them not lasting. Alternatively, the La sportiva Glaciers are a bit cheaper and lighter and very durable as well. A pair lasted me almost two full seasons.

In my experience, work boots just aren't as comfortable or as durable as mountaineering or backpacking boots. When you see the horrifying pictures of massive blisters and trenchfoot that people associate with planting, they almost always come from people using work boots. They simply arent meant to be walked for up to 16 km per day in (which can very easily happen if you have walk-in blocks).

Sebastian
Replant Forums Highballer
Posts: 124
Joined: Mon Jan 15, 2007 9:55 pm
Location: Ottawa

Re: Gronell Klondike Boots?

Post by Sebastian » Mon Mar 15, 2010 2:34 pm

I've used the Gronell Klondike Boots for two full seasons. They are amazing boots, totally bombproof, very waterproof, oh so comfortable, and you get used to the weight. I loved them in almost every way. The only problem I had was that between seasons they rotted between the sole and the boot. You can get them resoled (and MEC even offered to pay for it... don't tell them you're planting), but when I did that, it changed the fit enormously. It just wasn't the same boot anymore.

Luckily for me, MEC let me trade them for a new pair; however, the same thing happened to those over the next winter, so I took them in and got my money back (holy hell I love MEC).

I'm now goin on my second season with the La Sportiva Glaciers, and they're doing quite well. They're also really comfortable, really waterproof, and really durable.

sick.muse
Starting to Post
Posts: 2
Joined: Sat Jan 23, 2010 2:17 pm

Re: Gronell Klondike Boots?

Post by sick.muse » Mon Mar 15, 2010 3:02 pm

Thanks for your help :)

User avatar
gilkie
Regular Contributor
Posts: 44
Joined: Tue Jul 31, 2007 1:32 am

Re: Gronell Klondike Boots?

Post by gilkie » Fri Mar 19, 2010 10:50 am

You need steel toed caulk boots for the Quesnel area?! Who are you planting for that they would require you to have them in the interior?

Now people are gonna tell me that I've gone on a trip to crazy-town but I'm telling you, I swear by rubber boots from Zellers, not those over-priced $20 bastards but those sweet-ass $8 (damn inflation) ones with the Canadian-made tag on them. Stick a pair of insoles in them, get some soccer socks in case of that pesky leg chaff and your set. Cost $30. You'll go through 2 pairs a season, unless its this season and you'll only get 30 planting days anyway so then one should do it!

Guillermo
Regular Contributor
Posts: 26
Joined: Sun Mar 16, 2008 8:06 am

Re: Gronell Klondike Boots?

Post by Guillermo » Fri Mar 19, 2010 7:03 pm

Yeah... probably not a great idea to go with rubber boots... nobody will check for steel toes, but the Klondikes and the Glaciers have a hard toe cap that will offer way more protection than 8$ rubber boots or even regular hikers. Rubber boots offer zero arch support and ankle support, and have no bottom support for kicking your shovel. You'll basically be planting if waterproof slippers. This does seem to work for some people, but they are definitley not in the majority. So I guess what I'm trying to say is: If you show up for work in quesnel with only a pair of 8$ rubber boots from zellers, there is a 99% chance you are going to regret it.

User avatar
gilkie
Regular Contributor
Posts: 44
Joined: Tue Jul 31, 2007 1:32 am

Re: Gronell Klondike Boots?

Post by gilkie » Fri Mar 19, 2010 7:26 pm

Yes I will admit its not for everyone, but I've been wearing them for 9+ years and I swear by them!

On a side note Guillermo brings up a good point; for all you rookies out there, don't kick with your shovel unless you really have to. The added step in your planting movement will increase the amount of time and effort it takes to open a hole, increasing inefficiency and limiting your production. Do everything you can to cut out unnecessary movement, and most ground should allow you to strike the ground and make a hole without the need of a boot-kick. Sharpen your blade as it can help to.

(As you can tell its been so long since I've put a tree in the ground I'm starting to channel Don Cherry).

Post Reply

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 1 guest